Will Kentucky Be in the Top 20 by 2020?

That’s the question asked annually by a Prichard Committee analysis of key education indicators. The goal of the Prichard Committee is to have Kentucky among the Top 20 in the nation in key education indicators by 2020.  According to a press release announcing the most recent analysis of where Kentucky stands, there is some good news.  The state is on track to be in the Top 20 nationally in six key indicators of education success by 2020. This include number of AP credits, reading scores, and teacher salaries.

Here’s the entire release from Prichard:

LEXINGTON, Ky. – Moving Kentucky into the top tier of states in key areas of
education by 2020 will require a hard push for improvement in the next six
years, according to a new report from the Prichard Committee for Academic
Excellence.

The 2014 update of the Committee’s “Top 20 by 2020” found
Kentucky’s performance in six categories to be on track to reach the goal. These
include reading scores, Advanced Placement credits and teacher
salaries.

But other indicators show reason for concern. The report noted
that Kentucky lost ground in the math achievement of eighth-grade students and
the share of higher education costs that families must pay. The state’s
performance also showed no net improvement in total higher education funding or
bachelor’s degrees earned in science, technology, engineering and
math.

The state’s ranking in other areas showed some improvement, but not
at a rate sufficient to reach the Top 20 by 2020. These include the number of
adults with a high school diploma, preschool enrollment, per-pupil funding and
adults with a bachelor’s degree.

The Prichard Committee began its Top 20
measurements in 2008, when it issued a challenge to the state to accelerate the
improvement of its education system. The latest report is the third update of
the initial measurement. The update is available here.

Education Commissioner Terry Holliday applauded the report for highlighting Kentucky’s
progress in areas like reading, Advanced Placement and teacher salaries, and for
also providing a clear roadmap of the areas that need further attention going
forward.

“We are proud of the progress Kentucky students and educators
have made the past several years as they have embraced more rigorous standards
and become more focused on college- and career-readiness,” Holliday said. “At
the same time, the report confirms what we already know:  there is still much
work to be done. We need to be making faster gains in key content areas like
mathematics and science while also continuing to close achievement gaps so that
all students have the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in life. We are
committed to making continuous progress, and are grateful for partners like the
Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence for joining us in this critical
work.”

Bob King, president of the Council on Postsecondary Education,
noted the state’s increase in bachelor’s degrees, from 44th to 39th in the last
six years, and expressed the importance of partnerships to work toward the
Prichard Committee’s 2020 goal.

“The steady improvement in bachelor degrees or higher and adults with a high school diploma is welcome news to Kentucky’s economic future. We look forward to working alongside Prichard and our other partners to make even greater gains in the future.”

The update
also noted the Committee’s three overarching priorities for Kentucky
education:
·         A strong accountability system that measures the
performance of students, teachers, principals and postsecondary
graduates;
·         Adequate funding;
·         Sustained and expanded
engagement of parents, community members and businesses in support of
schools.

“It is great to see the areas where we are making good progress
but we still have a lot of work to do. We will continue to monitor these areas
and look forward to evidence of more forward progress in the 2016 report,” said
Stu Silberman, executive director of the Prichard Committee.

Find more on Kentucky education from the Prichard Blog

Hope Street Group Touts First Year Success

The Hope Street Group, a national non-partisan, non-profit organization that sponsored its first year of Kentucky Teacher Fellows in 2013-14, has released the results of a survey indicating the first year of the program was a success.

From the press release:

An independent evaluation conducted by Policy Studies Associates, Inc. determined that the first year of the Hope Street Group Kentucky State Teacher Fellows Program provided teachers with “a diverse, unique and transferable set of tools, training and resources” and that Kentucky education leaders “valued the data reported to them and acknowledged the important role Hope Street Group played and can play to support teachers’ participation in the policy process.”

With milestones including engaging over 20 percent of Kentucky’s K‑12 teachers and informing the implementation of the Professional Growth and Effectiveness System (PGES) and the Kentucky Core Academic Standards, education experts and program participants interviewed deemed the program “an overwhelming success.”

“What happened in Kentucky over the past year was impressive. The fellows we selected clearly understood their charge, embraced the task in front of them and ultimately gave our partners a real-time glimpse into classrooms to see what the reforms they have worked so hard to implement look like in practice,” said Dan Cruce, Hope Street Group’s Vice President of Education.

Now in its second year, the program continues with 21 outstanding Kentucky teachers. The fellowship empowers its participants to collect feedback and solutions from thousands of teachers to inform decision-making at state and district levels. Partners for this work include the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Education Association and the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence.

“KEA applauds Hope Street Group’s self-examination and desire to become even better at helping promote teacher participation in the issues facing public schools today,” said Mary Ann Blankenship, Executive Director of the Kentucky Education Association.

“It’s been an amazing experience,” said teacher fellow Sarah Yost, an English Language Arts Lead Teacher for Jefferson County Public Schools. “After my work with Hope Street Group, I feel more empowered and better respected as an educator. It makes me feel like I can effect real change without leaving the classroom, and my leadership has inspired others to do the same.”

The evaluation also recommended areas for improvement, including expanding and refocusing aspects of fellow training and creating an explicit strategy to leverage online network tools. With the assistance of partners such as 270 Strategies and Purpose, Hope Street Group is actively addressing these aspects of its program and enacted a number of recommended changes last month at its summer teacher fellow convening.

Hope Street Group is currently beginning the second year of its Kentucky State Teacher Fellows Program and launching the first year of its Hawaii State Teacher Fellows Program. Additional work is underway to expand the program to up to four additional states in 2015.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow @KYEdReport

 

About Kentucky’s Governor’s Scholars Program

Today, the Prichard Blog features a guest post by Aristofanes Cedeño, Executive Director and Academic Dean of the Governor’s Scholars Program.

Here are some highlights:

Today, the Governor’s Scholars Program boasts more than 25,000 alumni. Approximately 77% of them live right here in the Commonwealth, but whether they reside around the corner or around the world, they are doing great things. They are educators, entrepreneurs, and artists; Olympic athletes and Congressmen. Through their service and their leadership, they serve as beacons whose impact radiates within and beyond their communities. For 31 years, the Governor’s Scholars Program has been nurturing Kentucky’s best and brightest students in order to make our Commonwealth even better and brighter. The 32 nd summer will continue igniting the extraordinary potential of our future leaders.

When the Governor’s Scholars Program opens its three sessions in the summer of 2014, it will welcome our next generation of leaders representing all areas of Kentucky: Eastern (23%), Western (23%), Northern (12.1%), Central (25.3%), and Jefferson County (17%). In looking to the future, some experiences in life are truly transformational. The Governor’s Scholars initiative is an example of such experiences that change participants’ lives. Whether in the arts, business, or civic and economic matters, the mission and goals of the Program address the future of the Commonwealth. In so doing, we seek to honor our past and to adhere to the educational legacy of academic excellence that we inherited from the visionary leaders who created the Governor’s Scholars Program.

Read more.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

Education Advocacy in Kentucky

Oldham County High School Spanish Teacher Kip Hottman offers his take on advocacy in Kentucky.

Here’s a brief excerpt:

Last, but not least, I have had the pleasure of witnessing what Kentucky teachers are implementing in their classrooms. I am absolutely amazed at the passion and best practice that happens daily in classrooms all over our state, and I think that the students are blessed to be part of classroom environments in which they participate.

I love teaching and want to continue to advocate for my students, but I have learned that to be an educator I should advocate for all students, not just those that I see daily. My eyes are now open. My world has changed and I have to show some much needed respect to all of these organizations and to the wonderful educators in our state. So, I end this blog by addressing all those who advocate for our students by saying a simple, “Thank you Kentucky! Thank you for all that you do!”

The article breaks down the key education advocacy groups in Kentucky — though it leaves out Kentucky Association of School Administrators and the Kentucky School Boards Association.  Of course, Hottman’s piece is focused primarily on those who advocate on behalf of teachers.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport