JCTA to Picket Today

From the Courier-Journal:

The Jefferson County Teachers Association is urging its members to wear red and picket outside school district headquarters Tuesday afternoon ahead of a special meeting the school board is holding to discuss union negotiations.

The Jefferson County Board of Education is meeting at 4 p.m. at the Van Hoose Education Center, 3332 Newburg Road, to “discuss contract negotiation strategies.” Portions of the meeting will be in closed session, as union negotiation strategies are allowed to be discussed behind closed doors. Such meetings are not unusual during union negotiations.

“We’re asking members to attend the special-called meeting to show their concern about getting a fair contract with salaries and benefits,” said JCTA President Brent McKim.

Union leaders are concerned as teacher salary step increases have been frozen pending new contract negotiations.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport


 

 

JCPS and Teacher Compensation

An analysis of teacher compensation I did for Nashville included Louisville and four other districts. The districts were chosen because they were demographically similar to Nashville.

So, how does Louisville’s teacher compensation stack up to 5 other urban districts with a similar profile?

Here are the numbers:

                                  Start                    10                          20                      TOP

MNPS                     $42,082                $44,536                 $54,800              $55,757

Louisville              $41,756                $53,759                 $69,514                $70,636

Charlotte               $37,946               $46,008                $53,954                $58,525

Austin                     $46,401               $48,837                $55,477                 $70,751

Atlanta                   $44,312               $54,167                 $62,075                 $66,467

Denver                   $38,765              $47,136                 $53,838*

*Denver has a teacher compensation system known as ProComp and the highest step is 13. Teachers in Denver earn the base pay indicated plus are eligible for incentives and base pay increases based on professional development, advanced degrees, and measures of student outcomes.

Based on these numbers, Louisville offers competitive starting pay and long-term earnings there are among the best — outpacing even the much-larger city of Atlanta.

A more comprehensive analysis might include additional cities and factors such as cost of living. Of course, the cost to live in Louisville is less than Atlanta or Denver — but including cities such as Memphis, Indianapolis, and Columbus might yield even more useful information.

That said, JCPS appears to be doing well by its teachers in terms of pay.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

 

Where Does the Money Go in JCPS?

Toni Konz at the Courier-Journal has a fascinating breakdown of the JCPS budget and where the money goes, school-by-school.  65%, or $733 million, goes directly to schools.

Eastern, Ballard, and PRP are the most expensive JCPS schools, coming in at around $12 million each.