Common Core Success

The Wall Street Journal has a story out today on Kentucky’s success with the Common Core State Standards and the relatively minimal pushback the standards have seen there relative to other states.

I’ve written before about Kentucky’s Common Core pioneering and the early start and strong communication tactics used to help ensure success there.

Specifically, on communication and community engagement, it has been noted:

Regarding the success of these efforts, the report notes:

The expansive outreach campaign has helped the vast majority of teachers feel comfortable and ready to teach the Common Core standards. Last November and December, the Kentucky Department of Education conducted an anonymous, voluntary survey to gauge educator attitudes about the state’s new standards. According to survey findings, 86 percent of respondents believe that they are prepared to teach the standards, and 90 percent believe that the new standards are more rigorous than the previous standards.

Despite an earlier report noting some fairly dismal scores as the state shifted to Common Core, current trends indicate an improvement in both scores and high school graduation rates.

Kentucky has, since 1990, been an education policy pioneer. One hallmark of the success experienced in the Bluegrass State is an aggressive communication strategy that includes all stakeholders. Additionally, the state engages both educators and the business community early on in any reform discussion.

While it may be too late for some states currently struggling to get a handle on Common Core dissent, Kentucky’s experience suggests a model for other states in terms of how to handle education reform generally.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

 

 

Core Reversal

Legislation (HB33) has been filed in the Kentucky General Assembly that would repeal the Common Core State Standards now in place in Kentucky and prohibit adoption or use of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Governor Steve Beshear previously stood up for the science standards when a committee of legislators opposed them.

Here’s a legislative summary including a list of bill sponsors:

HB 33 (BR 97) – T. Kerr, L. Bechler, R. Bunch, K. Imes, T. Moore, S. Santoro, D. St. Onge

AN ACT relating to public school standards.
Create a new section to KRS Chapter 158 to prohibit the Kentucky Board of Education and the Kentucky Department of Education from implementing the English language arts and mathematics academic content standards developed by the Common Core Standards Initiative and the science academic content standards developed by the Next Generation Science Standards Initiative; require the state board to recommend new content standards to school districts and schools after consultation with the Council on Postsecondary Education; require public involvement in standards development; clarify the authority of the local board of education to adopt standards which differ from or exceed the standards approved by the state board; clarify that the school-based decision making councils shall develop policies based upon the standards adopted by the local boards of education; prohibit state officials from ceding control of education content standards and assessments; prohibit withholding of state funds from school districts for adopting different academic content standards; amend KRS 156.070 to limit disclosure of personally identifiable information; direct the Kentucky Board of Education to require that the Department of Education and all school districts adhere to transparency and privacy standards when outsourcing data and Web-based tasks to vendors; clarify vendor contract requirements; amend KRS 158.6453 to permit a local board of education to supplement the state board-approved academic content standards with higher and more rigorous standards and require school councils to use them to fulfill curriculum policy requirements; amend KRS 160.345 to clarify school council curriculum policy authority.

More on Kentucky’s experience with Common Core:

Core Defense

Core Pioneers

Kicking PARCC to the Curb

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

Community Outreach and Common Core Success

The Center for American Progress has a new report out: Roadmap for a Successful Transition to the Common Core in States and Districts in which recommendations for transitioning to the Common Core State Standards are made.

The report highlights states and districts getting things right about Common Core implementation. Specifically, the report mentions Kentucky’s efforts around community engagement and the Common Core State Standards.

Noteworthy is the mention of the aggressive communication efforts by the Kentucky Department of Education in conjunction with the Chamber of Commerce and the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence.

Regarding the success of these efforts, the report notes:

The expansive outreach campaign has helped the vast majority of teachers feel comfortable and ready to teach the Common Core standards. Last November and December, the Kentucky Department of Education conducted an anonymous, voluntary survey to gauge educator attitudes about the state’s new standards. According to survey findings, 86 percent of respondents believe that they are prepared to teach the standards, and 90 percent believe that the new standards are more rigorous than the previous standards.

Kentucky was the first state to adopt the Common Core State Standards and the state has consistently communicated expectations to both teachers and the larger community.  The coordinated communication effort appears to be paying off in a successful implementation of the standards.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

Common Core and Community Engagement

Deborah Walker of the Louisville-based Collaborative for Teaching and Learning offers thoughts on how to engage parents as Common Core State Standards become the norm.

She outlines three key principles:

1. School leaders should communicate the ways CCSS help support student academic success.

2. School leaders should note that CCSS are designed to guide students toward college and career readiness

3. School leaders should highlight the importance of nurturing a student’s future aspirations.

The Common Core State Standards were designed to help promote critical thinking and guide students to a deeper understanding of key concepts.

Whether or not that goal is achieved will be determined by how states implement the CCSS.  Parent and community engagement is one key to success.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow @KYEdReport

 

 

Kicking PARCC to the Curb

Kentucky announced on Friday that it is withdrawing from the Common Core testing consortium known as PARCC.

Kentucky will allow PARCC (Pearson) to bid on new tests, but is also seeking alternate vendors to develop tests that meet the Common Core State Standards.  Kentucky was the first state to adopt the standards and implement testing based on them.

Kentucky will continue to use the CCSS to guide its curriculum, but will no longer use the common test, unless PARCC wins the contract.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow @KYEdReport

 

Don’t Stop the Music

A Kentucky teacher makes a plea for the importance of music education in the midst of tough budget decisions:

One of the first things we learned in my music education program my freshman year of college was how to advocate for music education. I always thought it odd that I would learn how to keep my job before I ever got one. Now as the budget gets tight in districts around the state as well as my own, I am continually approached by my teaching peers wondering what programs will be cut next year. Will my program be cut? With the push for more focus on Common Core and reduced funding, is there room for extras? But then I have to ask, why cut something that only reinforces and supports the Common Core while fully implementing 21st Century Skills and the Kentucky Program Reviews?

Read More

For more on Kentucky education policy and politics, follow us @KYEdReport

Core Pioneers

Kentucky was the first state in the nation to adopt and implement the Common Core State Standards.  They’ve just finished their second year of Common Core tests.  So, how’s it going?

The good folks over at Hechinger Report have some analysis.

Here are some highlights:

1) Results are mixed.  This is to be expected.  It’s early on in the process.  Kentucky experienced similar “growing pains” with KERA and ultimately ended up with some pretty solid results — overall improvement on NAEP standings and stronger scores for low-income kids.  Are they where they want to be? No.  But the path of raising standards and focusing on both investment and equity has gotten results.  20 years ago, Kentucky and Tennessee were in roughly the same place in terms of NAEP standings.  Now, Kentucky’s students consistently test higher on NAEP.

2) The improvement is not fast enough. Scores on the Common Core tests are still pretty low.  So, state officials want faster improvement.  However, unlike the KERA reform, this reform has not been met with significant new investment in schools.  And, some advocates and even the Commissioner of Education are calling for a renewed commitment to investing in Kentucky schools.

3) It may be too much, too soon for some kids. Teachers and parents are expressing frustration over the “pushing down” of standards to lower and lower grade levels.  That is, what was once covered in 6th grade math is now expected in 5th grade.  There is some legitimate concern that younger children aren’t developmentally ready for what the Common Core expects.

4) There is some good news. Despite the somewhat bleak picture painted by Hechinger as they state, “Across the state, test scores are still dismal…,” a closer look at this year’s results offers some key points of optimism. Specifically, the Prichard Committee points out:

Looking at group patterns, students with disabilities improved in every subject, and the Gap, free and reduced meal, and African American groups improved in all but one–with most of those results being quite strong. 

So, other states should watch Kentucky — to see what’s working and what can be improved.  And Kentucky policymakers should focus on providing the necessary investments to make Common Core work.  Additionally, the Commissioner and Governor should be willing to make changes to implementation where necessary — and listen to educators for guidance on where those changes are needed.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport

 

Core Defense

Gov. Steve Beshear and Commissioner Terry Holliday defend Kentucky’s participation in the Common Core in an op-ed in the Lane Report.

In the article, they note that Kentucky was the first state to teach and test using the Common Core State Standards. They also note that the stronger curriculum is yielding results in terms of increased graduation rates and a decreased need for remediation among high school graduates attending Kentucky colleges.

Kentucky’s leading role should be no surprise.  Since the Kentucky Education Reform Act of 1990, Kentucky has taken the lead on using rigorous, relevant curriculum and holding students to high standards.  The higher expectations combined with increased investment in schools helped Kentucky become one of the fastest-improving states on the NAEP.

The lesson of 20 years of progress is that successful reform requires meaningful investment.  Or, as Stu Silberman put it, Reform Without Funding is Dead.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KyEdReport