Blankenship: Professional Pay Needed for Teachers

Over at Education Week, Prichard Committee Executive Director Stu Silberman interviewed Kentucky Education Association Executive Director Mary Ann Blankenship.

Among the highlights, Blankenship noted that teacher pay in Kentucky has remained essentially flat over the past 5 years, with some teachers actually seeing less take home pay now than they did then.

She also noted that funding cuts in recent years have meant teachers are spending more and more of their own money on school resources.

Like Silberman and Education Commissioner Terry Holliday, Blankenship is challenging Kentucky policy makers to put schools first in the 2014 legislative session. Not only do teachers need professional pay, the schools where they teach need adequate resources.  With less state funding, those two essentials are becoming more and more difficult to provide.

Blankenship noted that Kentucky continues to make significant gains in education achievement and that teachers have been very responsive to a fast-changing education environment in light of the move to Common Core.

But, with all those challenges, the reality of lower pay and fewer resources will eventually take a toll.  Kentucky must act now to reverse that cycle — policy makers must ensure better, smarter pay and adequate resources for schools in order to ensure that progress is not slowed.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport

 

Core Pioneers

Kentucky was the first state in the nation to adopt and implement the Common Core State Standards.  They’ve just finished their second year of Common Core tests.  So, how’s it going?

The good folks over at Hechinger Report have some analysis.

Here are some highlights:

1) Results are mixed.  This is to be expected.  It’s early on in the process.  Kentucky experienced similar “growing pains” with KERA and ultimately ended up with some pretty solid results — overall improvement on NAEP standings and stronger scores for low-income kids.  Are they where they want to be? No.  But the path of raising standards and focusing on both investment and equity has gotten results.  20 years ago, Kentucky and Tennessee were in roughly the same place in terms of NAEP standings.  Now, Kentucky’s students consistently test higher on NAEP.

2) The improvement is not fast enough. Scores on the Common Core tests are still pretty low.  So, state officials want faster improvement.  However, unlike the KERA reform, this reform has not been met with significant new investment in schools.  And, some advocates and even the Commissioner of Education are calling for a renewed commitment to investing in Kentucky schools.

3) It may be too much, too soon for some kids. Teachers and parents are expressing frustration over the “pushing down” of standards to lower and lower grade levels.  That is, what was once covered in 6th grade math is now expected in 5th grade.  There is some legitimate concern that younger children aren’t developmentally ready for what the Common Core expects.

4) There is some good news. Despite the somewhat bleak picture painted by Hechinger as they state, “Across the state, test scores are still dismal…,” a closer look at this year’s results offers some key points of optimism. Specifically, the Prichard Committee points out:

Looking at group patterns, students with disabilities improved in every subject, and the Gap, free and reduced meal, and African American groups improved in all but one–with most of those results being quite strong. 

So, other states should watch Kentucky — to see what’s working and what can be improved.  And Kentucky policymakers should focus on providing the necessary investments to make Common Core work.  Additionally, the Commissioner and Governor should be willing to make changes to implementation where necessary — and listen to educators for guidance on where those changes are needed.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport

 

Core Defense

Gov. Steve Beshear and Commissioner Terry Holliday defend Kentucky’s participation in the Common Core in an op-ed in the Lane Report.

In the article, they note that Kentucky was the first state to teach and test using the Common Core State Standards. They also note that the stronger curriculum is yielding results in terms of increased graduation rates and a decreased need for remediation among high school graduates attending Kentucky colleges.

Kentucky’s leading role should be no surprise.  Since the Kentucky Education Reform Act of 1990, Kentucky has taken the lead on using rigorous, relevant curriculum and holding students to high standards.  The higher expectations combined with increased investment in schools helped Kentucky become one of the fastest-improving states on the NAEP.

The lesson of 20 years of progress is that successful reform requires meaningful investment.  Or, as Stu Silberman put it, Reform Without Funding is Dead.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KyEdReport

Value-Added Value?

I wrote recently about the limited value of value-added data when it comes to predicting teacher effectiveness.

Now, more information has come out regarding the impact of value-added data on education policy.  Specifically, the impact the Tennessee Value-Added Assessment System (TVAAS) has had on Tennessee education outcomes.

TVAAS was included among a set of reforms adopted as part of the Education Improvement Act in Tennessee in 1992.  The EIA was passed in a response to a lawsuit regarding inequity in school funding.  A similar situation precipitated Kentucky’s Education Reform Act (KERA) in 1990.  Over the last 20 years, however, the two states have taken different approaches and have different results to show for their efforts.

Here’s the big takeaway from this piece on the utility of TVAAS data in terms of its impact on student achievement:

Tennessee received a D on K-12 achievement when compared to other states based on NAEP achievement levels and gains, poverty gaps, graduation rates, and Advanced Placement test scores (Quality Counts 2011, p. 46).  Educational progress made in other states on NAEP [from 1992 to 2011] lowered Tennessee’s rankings:

• from 36th/42 to 46th/52 in the nation in fourth-grade math[2]

• from 29th/42 to 42nd/52 in fourth-grade reading[3]

• from 35th/42 to 46th/52 in eighth-grade math

• from 25th/38 (1998) to 42nd/52 in eighth-grade reading.

That’s right. Tennessee has lost ground relative to other states since the implementation of its TVAAS system as well as its other education reforms adopted in 1992.  Funding inequity persists, and while the overall numbers in terms of student achievement have gone slightly up, other states have moved forward faster. That means Tennessee is essentially worse off relative to the country than it was when it started.

One key difference in Tennessee is persistently low investment in schools. Which highlights the need for Kentucky to continue its focus on investing in schools and doing what works to achieve proficiency.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KyEdReport

 

Breaking Down the Test Results

The Prichard Blog has a nice breakdown of the recently released testing results in Kentucky.

It’s hard to say it’s all good news – but, there’s plenty of good news.  And of course, room for improvement.

Here are the key takeaways:

Looking at group patterns, students with disabilities improved in every subject, and the Gap, free and reduced meal, and African American groups improved in all but one–with most of those results being quite strong.   Students with limited English proficiency declined in all but one subject, and Asian students declined in three of six.
For all students, the pattern is strong growth in science, social studies and writing, moderate growth in reading and a small uptick in language mechanics, but a disturbing decline in mathematics.
Looking at the whole sweeping picture, I think the spotlight developments are:

  • Successes for the Gap group, free and reduced meal students, and students with disabilities.
  • Weaknesses for students with limited English proficiency and African-American, Asian, Hispanic students.
  • Growth in elementary writing and language mechanics, middle school reading and language mechanics, and high school science and social studies.
  • Troubling declines in elementary reading and science, middle school mathematics and science, and high school mathematics.

It’s important, then, that Kentucky keep focusing on next steps — and that investment in schools keeps up with a clear need to move toward greater proficiency.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KyEdReport