Kentucky Education News – 11-22-13

This week saw a focused push by education advocates to convince the Kentucky General Assembly to restore education funding to 2008 levels.

Stu Silberman of the Prichard Committee penned this piece calling for a continued focus on progress.

Meanwhile, Andrew Brennen, the student member of the Prichard Committee, made a presentation during which he noted:

Some students pay $130 in fees, but don’t have access to textbooks. And those who do have textbooks often find them in “decrepit” shape, a tangible symbol of the cuts, said Brennen.

Finally, the Courier-Journal ran a story on Superintendent salaries, noting that while some have actually decreased and most have remained relatively flat in recent years, a number of districts have actually substantially increased Superintendent pay.

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Silberman: Don’t Stop the Progress

Will Kentucky schools keep moving forward?

That’s the question Stu Silberman of the Prichard Committee is asking.

And he’s not alone.  To date, 100 Kentucky school districts have signed a letter calling for the restoration of SEEK funds to 2008 levels.

Education supporters have a rally planned in Frankfort for Thursday to press the case for increased support for schools.

And by increased support, they mean a return to 2008 funding levels.  Because while dollar amounts for SEEK have remained constant, the number of students in school has increased.  That means districts are being asked to do more (a lot more, due to Common Core and a continued push for high standards in Kentucky) with less.

As Silberman points out, the flex funds are critical, too.  Those dollars, now almost gone, provided the extra support to help those students and families most in need.

Without them, Silberman notes that students will simply fall behind.

Kentucky has made steady progress since 1990.  The 20-year trend in NAEP scores shows the state moving forward year after year.

That progress may well stop if proper investment in proven programs is not provided.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KyEdReport

 

 

Kentucky Schools SEEK Funding Restoration

Gaming, Tax Reform among ideas for generating revenue for schools

Kentucky’s public schools are seeking a restoration of funding to 2008 levels in the 2014 budget year.

Yes, you read that correctly.  Kentucky school districts want to go back to 2008 funding levels.  That’s because funding has steadily been decreasing for Kentucky public schools.  First, the economic collapse in 2008 caused tough budget years.  Then, the legislature faced its own budget challenges because of a failure to address public pension underfunding.  So, the Kentucky General Assembly didn’t decrease funding in the SEEK formula, they just left it the same.  However, the number of students in Kentucky schools steadily increased over the past five years.  Meaning schools and districts are operating on less dollars per pupil than they were just 5 years ago.

In addition to flat SEEK funding, “flexible funds” for schools have actually decreased.  So, districts are left to either make up the funds locally (difficult in many rural communities) or, go without.  Districts report cutting items like foreign language and school counseling, even eliminating the use of buses for extra-curricular activities.

While districts have so far gotten by, they say that if the trend continues, more serious program cuts are on the way.

For their part, lawmakers have generally sounded unsympathetic, noting they’ve had to balance some tough budgets.  Of course, it was the General Assembly that failed to properly fund promised pensions in the past — so, they created the mess they now complain about.

That said, Governor Beshear has talked about both tax reform and expanded gaming as ways to generate revenue to mitigate the state’s budget woes.

Both Education Commissioner Terry Holliday and Prichard Committee Executive Director Stu Silberman have been calling for a renewed commitment to proper funding of Kentucky’s schools.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport