Prichard Committee Gets New Leader

From a press release:

LEXINGTON, Ky. – An education policy leader and long-time advocate for Kentucky’s children has been named executive director of the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence.

Brigitte Blom Ramsey was chosen by the committee’s board of directors to succeed Stu Silberman, who will retire effective September 4, 2015. She has been associate executive director of the statewide citizens’ group since May of last year.

“We are very excited Brigitte has agreed to serve as our next executive director,” said Franklin Jelsma, a Louisville attorney who chairs the committee’s board. “Above all else, we were looking for a leader who is passionate about improving public education in Kentucky. That is Brigitte in a nutshell. She is driven by her desire to help children.”

Ramsey, a resident of Falmouth, is former director of public policy for United Way of Greater Cincinnati, where she provided leadership on early education initiatives and efforts to improve education funding. She served on the Kentucky Board of Education from May 2008, when she was appointed by the governor, until April 2014, when she left the board to take the Prichard Committee post. She held the position of vice chair during her last year on the state board.

Her background also includes work as an advocate for children and extensive experience as a researcher on state tax and budget issues and poverty in Kentucky. She’s been a member of Kentucky’s Early Childhood Advisory Council since 2010 and was an elected member of the Pendleton County Board of Education from 1998 to 2008. Ramsey holds a master’s degree in public policy from the University of Kentucky’s Martin School and undergraduate degrees from Northern Kentucky University.

“It is a tremendous honor to have the opportunity to lead the next generation of the Prichard Committee’s work,” Ramsey said. “The progress in education and citizen engagement over the last three decades has been remarkable. I look forward to working with the committee’s members all across Kentucky to ensure our future success – on behalf of our students, our schools and our communities.”
Jelsma expressed the committee’s appreciation to Silberman, whose retirement will follow four years with the organization and 41 years in education, including work as superintendent of the Fayette County and Daviess County public school systems.

“We are deeply indebted to him for his years of service and his tireless work on behalf of education,” Jelsma said.

Silberman expressed strong support for his successor and excitement about the work ahead.
“Brigitte will do a fantastic job and continue the great work that began in 1983” when the committee was founded. “It has been a blessing to work beside her during this year, and I look forward to the four-month transition we will have together. The committee is in good hands as we move into the future.”

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

 

Accountability Changes

Susan Weston has a report over at the Prichard Blog that details recent actions taken by the State Board of Education that will change (and tighten) accountability standards for Kentucky schools.

The changes include additional gap reporting, tightening the monitoring of focus schools relative to graduation rates, strengthening the requirements for AMOs, and an additional reporting element in growth results.

It seems to be a step forward, in that it strengthens existing requirements, keeps some reporting, and adds some higher standards.

The full report and the documents can be found in Susan’s blog.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

 

Can the Internet Replace Great Teaching?

Susan Weston says no:

I’m provoked because I think he’s missed the most exciting current thought about teaching and learning.  Everything I’m hearing in Kentucky education says that live adults, actively engaged with students as individuals and team participants, will always be essential to the kind of learning that matters most.

Live teachers!

That’s what kids need, she says.

Here’s her full analysis.

Holliday Announces Retirement

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday announced today he plans to retire from his post effective August 31st. Although the move came on April 1st, it was most certainly not a joke.

Holliday informed his staff in the morning, then presented a letter to the State Board of Education. He has served as Education Commissioner since 2010.

No word yet on the process to replace him.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport