Seeking a Commissioner

With the retirement of Commissioner Terry Holliday, Kentucky finds itself searching for a new Commissioner of Education.  Here’s the official job posting:

The Kentucky Board of Education invites applications and nominations for the position of Commissioner of Education. The Commissioner reports to the 11-member Kentucky Board of Education and leads the Kentucky Department of Education in providing resources and guidance to Kentucky’s public schools and districts as they implement the Commonwealth’s P-12 education requirements. The department also serves as the Commonwealth’s liaison for federal education requirements and funding opportunities. Located in Frankfort, Kentucky, the department has approximately 1,100 full-time employees (includes the Kentucky School for the Deaf, Kentucky School for the Blind, Kentucky Department of Education Frankfort-based employees, Office of Career and Technical Education Frankfort-based central office staff and 53 area technical centers).

The board is seeking an individual who shares its commitment to putting the needs and interests of students first and foremost and preparing them for success in their education, career and citizenship. Partnering with educators to collectively deliver on this promise presents the selected person the chance to apply innovative approaches in order to move students beyond college- and career-readiness toward global competency. The individual also must pursue difficult issues with a firmness of purpose, exhibit respect of others, show consistency and depth of thought, and present a deep appreciation and respect for diversity and inclusion.
The successful candidate must provide leadership that assists the board in developing the vision, strategy and objectives to advance the Commonwealth’s priorities of rigorous standards–based education. Further, the commissioner must build consensus among constituency groups such as legislative, business, community and school leaders.
An advanced degree is required. The successful candidate must have experience in leading complex organizations as well as a deep commitment to reaching proficiency in teaching and learning for all Kentucky schools.
Greenwood/Asher & Associates, Inc. is assisting the Kentucky Board of Education in the search. Initial screening of applications will begin immediately and will continue until an appointment is made. For best consideration, submit your materials by July 17, 2015. Individuals who wish to nominate a candidate should submit a letter of nomination including contact information for the nominee. Application materials should include a letter addressing how the candidate’s experiences match the position requirements, a curriculum vitae or resume and five references. Submission of materials as PDF attachments is strongly encouraged. Confidential inquiries, nominations and application materials should be directed to:
Jan Greenwood, Betty Turner Asher, Partners
Greenwood/Asher & Associates, Inc.
42 Business Centre Drive, Suite 206
Miramar Beach, Florida 32550
Phone: 850-650-2277 / Fax: 850-650-2272
Email: jangreenwood@greenwoodsearch.com
Email: bettyasher@greenwoodsearch.com
Email: shelleyfeather@greenwoodsearch.com
To see the posting at the Department’s site, click here.
For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

 

PBL as Turnaround Strategy

One elementary school in Lexington is using Project-Based Learning to turnaround its performance. An article detailing the approach also notes it is a multi-year commitment focused on success, not immediate results.

I previously wrote about Danville’s use of PBL as a hopeful experiment and an interesting reconnection to Kentucky’s KERA reforms of the 1990s.

Now, it seems Mary Todd Elementary in Lexington is embracing the approach as a way to improve results for the school. Interestingly, the emphasis on hands-on learning means field trips and technology are needed — that is, more investment in the school.

From the story:

The school in north Lexington is trying to transform student achievement with a concept called project-based learning. It is a system in which students learn classroom subjects by doing meaningful projects that relate to real situations in the community. The concept prepares students for college and careers, Kirchner said.
It is a three-to five-year process, “not a quick fix,” she said.

First- and third-graders are trying the method first, and Kirchner hopes to implement it schoolwide by 2017.
 
The transformation is needed in part because Mary Todd is considered a low-performing school. It had a score of 52.9 out of 100 in Kentucky’s testing and accountability program in 2013-14. Mary Todd is classified by the state as “needs improvement/progressing” as opposed to “proficient” or “distinguished.”
The story is an interesting one because of the approach — using more field trips, hands-on experiences, and projects to promote the learning students need to excel.
Rather than attempting to improve test scores by endless drilling, this approach focuses on providing education that illuminates concepts through experience.
And the school’s principal notes the effort doesn’t come without a cost:
The achievement gap between poor, disabled and minority students and other students is not going to close immediately, Kirchner said.

 
“Nor is it going to close based on the budget and staffing that we are given by the school district,” she said.
To do PBL well, it takes a commitment of time and an investment of resources.
For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport