Kentucky Touts ACT Gains

With today’s release of the ACT College and Career Readiness report, the Kentucky Department of Education is touting the fact that the state’s students are making continuous gains in terms of readiness.  The state points to three-year trends that show the number of Kentucky students hitting college/career ready benchmarks steadily (and slowly) heading upward.

The trend data is noteworthy because it establishes that while Kentucky still has work to do, the progress is steady and real.

What’s fascinating is that this progress has been made without any of the trendy reforms oft-touted by today’s education reform crowd.  Kentucky still has no Charter Schools.  There aren’t voucher schemes in the state or any school system.  Kentucky has yet to tie teacher evaluations or licensure to test scores.  In fact, Commissioner Holliday tweeted today that recent polling data on the issue of tying teacher evaluations to test scores was reason to take further pause before considering using scores for the evaluation process.

What that means for Kentucky kids is that they won’t be subject to a barrage of new tests used primarily for creating a number score for a teacher.  Instead, they can expect the same focus on high standards and strong teaching that has been the backbone of Kentucky education policy for more than 20 years now.

What’s even more telling, perhaps, is that in Tennessee, a state that has adopted liberal charter enrollment policy, changed teacher evaluation radically, and recently passed new standards tying teacher licensing to test scores, there was no release today touting similar gains in college and career readiness.

In fact, if you simply look at head-to-head results, Kentucky students test higher (slightly) than Tennessee’s in 4 out of 5 categories.

What’s the difference? Instead of trying every trendy new reform and developing test-dependent policies, Kentucky has focused on rigor and investment.  The comparison of the two states is an important lesson for those in Kentucky who will call for vouchers or charters or score-based teacher evaluations in the 2014 legislative session.

Kentucky should stay the course, continue investing, and move its schools forward.

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