KY Schools Need Technology Funding

Tabetha Cooksey, a middle school science teacher at Cumberland County Middle School discusses the importance of school funding as it relates to technology.

Here is her central argument:

If dollars are not included in the budget for textbooks or e-books, then how are our students going to become independent learners? We want our teachers to facilitate student learning, but without these tools it is impossible to improve the learning experience of students. Our students need the opportunity to extend their learning beyond the classroom with virtual labs and interactive assignments that expand their understanding of what is being taught.

 

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

Is Kentucky Invested in the Future?

Not yet, according to Brad Clark, a Hope Street Group Fellow and teacher in Woodford County.

He writes passionately about the need to properly invest in Kentucky’s future by investing in its students and teachers.

He notes the need for additional resources in schools:

I am not exaggerating when I say that the fourth grade textbook we use to teach Kentucky History in 2014 is the exact same textbook — with a picture of Daniel Boone standing triumphantly on the front cover — that I used when I was in 4th grade in 1991.

And he notes the lack of investment in meaningful professional development for teachers:

 I have even designed and submitted a “Professional Growth Plan” that sits idle in a folder in an office in my building. Yet, I have no way of implementing my strategies for refining my craft. I do not blame my principal for this because he wants every student and teacher in his building to get better at what they do, but he lacks the necessary resources to make that happen.

His central point is that Kentucky is at a crossroads.  While investment in education increased steadily from 1990-2008 following the Kentucky Education Reform Act, that investment has tapered in recent years.  The per pupil funding provided by SEEK has actually declined.

Governor Beshear has proposed a budget that begins to reverse this trend, in some cases at the expense of other areas of state government.

While Kentucky made historic progress that garnered national attention during the years of investment following KERA, those gains are in danger. With new standards for students and new evaluations for teachers, now more than ever, Kentucky must invest in its schools.

Lawmakers would do well to heed the words of Mr. Clark and begin the process of re-investing in Kentucky schools.  They should also view this year’s investment as a starting point and find ways in the future to continue significant investment in Kentucky’s schools and its future.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow @KYEdReport

Kentucky Schools SEEK Funding Restoration

Gaming, Tax Reform among ideas for generating revenue for schools

Kentucky’s public schools are seeking a restoration of funding to 2008 levels in the 2014 budget year.

Yes, you read that correctly.  Kentucky school districts want to go back to 2008 funding levels.  That’s because funding has steadily been decreasing for Kentucky public schools.  First, the economic collapse in 2008 caused tough budget years.  Then, the legislature faced its own budget challenges because of a failure to address public pension underfunding.  So, the Kentucky General Assembly didn’t decrease funding in the SEEK formula, they just left it the same.  However, the number of students in Kentucky schools steadily increased over the past five years.  Meaning schools and districts are operating on less dollars per pupil than they were just 5 years ago.

In addition to flat SEEK funding, “flexible funds” for schools have actually decreased.  So, districts are left to either make up the funds locally (difficult in many rural communities) or, go without.  Districts report cutting items like foreign language and school counseling, even eliminating the use of buses for extra-curricular activities.

While districts have so far gotten by, they say that if the trend continues, more serious program cuts are on the way.

For their part, lawmakers have generally sounded unsympathetic, noting they’ve had to balance some tough budgets.  Of course, it was the General Assembly that failed to properly fund promised pensions in the past — so, they created the mess they now complain about.

That said, Governor Beshear has talked about both tax reform and expanded gaming as ways to generate revenue to mitigate the state’s budget woes.

Both Education Commissioner Terry Holliday and Prichard Committee Executive Director Stu Silberman have been calling for a renewed commitment to proper funding of Kentucky’s schools.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport

Commissioner Holliday Calls for Investment in Education

Following a recent post by Stu Silberman from the Prichard Committee, Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday blogged about the need for new investment in Kentucky schools.

Whether it is through expanded gaming, tax reform, or a combination of both, Holliday makes the point that Kentucky schools can’t keep moving forward and producing sound results without a commitment to more revenue.

Specifically, he notes:

As commissioner I am using this blog to announce my strong support for state legislators to address two possible funding sources during the 2014 session. I strongly support efforts at tax reform and also strongly support expanded gaming. These are not popular issues and they are extremely difficult to deal with during an election year, however, my job is to alert decision makers that without adequate funding, Kentucky educators will not be able to maintain current levels of student performance and certainly will not be able to continue improving student performance.

This is pretty important.  As Silberman’s piece noted, Kentucky has made tremendous gains over the past 20+ years and is well-positioned to keep making gains.  But absent additional investment, those gains will be stymied.

If Kentucky legislators are serious about education excellence, they’ll commit to doing the hard work of finding the funding. As I have noted from time to time over at Tennessee Education Report, Kentucky has made gains by a commitment to investment in schools.  And Kentucky’s kids achieve at higher rates than Tennessee’s — in no small part, I contend, due to Kentucky’s higher investment per student than Tennessee.  But if that commitment wanes, Kentucky’s gains may well stop.

And of course, although Kentucky has made gains in the past 20 years, there remains much work to do to ensure every child in the Commonwealth has access to an excellent education.

For more on Kentucky education policy, follow us @KyEdReport