Core Reversal

Legislation (HB33) has been filed in the Kentucky General Assembly that would repeal the Common Core State Standards now in place in Kentucky and prohibit adoption or use of the Next Generation Science Standards.

Governor Steve Beshear previously stood up for the science standards when a committee of legislators opposed them.

Here’s a legislative summary including a list of bill sponsors:

HB 33 (BR 97) – T. Kerr, L. Bechler, R. Bunch, K. Imes, T. Moore, S. Santoro, D. St. Onge

AN ACT relating to public school standards.
Create a new section to KRS Chapter 158 to prohibit the Kentucky Board of Education and the Kentucky Department of Education from implementing the English language arts and mathematics academic content standards developed by the Common Core Standards Initiative and the science academic content standards developed by the Next Generation Science Standards Initiative; require the state board to recommend new content standards to school districts and schools after consultation with the Council on Postsecondary Education; require public involvement in standards development; clarify the authority of the local board of education to adopt standards which differ from or exceed the standards approved by the state board; clarify that the school-based decision making councils shall develop policies based upon the standards adopted by the local boards of education; prohibit state officials from ceding control of education content standards and assessments; prohibit withholding of state funds from school districts for adopting different academic content standards; amend KRS 156.070 to limit disclosure of personally identifiable information; direct the Kentucky Board of Education to require that the Department of Education and all school districts adhere to transparency and privacy standards when outsourcing data and Web-based tasks to vendors; clarify vendor contract requirements; amend KRS 158.6453 to permit a local board of education to supplement the state board-approved academic content standards with higher and more rigorous standards and require school councils to use them to fulfill curriculum policy requirements; amend KRS 160.345 to clarify school council curriculum policy authority.

More on Kentucky’s experience with Common Core:

Core Defense

Core Pioneers

Kicking PARCC to the Curb

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

Charter Legislation Filed

As predicted by Education Commissioner Terry Holliday, legislation allowing charter schools in Kentucky has been filed for this legislative session.

Kentucky is one of 8 states that doesn’t allow charter schools, and in spite of two decades of steady education progress, there is some pressure to authorize charters for districts with a significant number of “low-performing” schools.

Holliday has suggested probably allowing four or five charters to start, and the most likely location would be Jefferson County Public Schools.

Here’s the summary of the bill, which includes the current House sponsors:

HB 174/LM/AA (BR 237) – B. Montell, R. Benvenuti III, J. Fischer, M. Harmon, A. Koenig, S. Lee, J. Miller, T. Moore, D. Osborne, D. St. Onge, R. Webber

AN ACT relating to charter schools and making an appropriation therefor.
Create new sections of KRS Chapter 160 to describe the intent of the General Assembly and the purposes of authorizing public charter schools; define terms; establish the Kentucky Public Charter School Commission and identify membership selection and responsibilities of members; outline the requirements and limitations on the establishment of charter schools including identification of charter school authorizers; describe responsibilities of authorizers; describe charter school application, renewal, and revocation processes; establish the Kentucky Public Charter School Commission trust fund and identify uses of the fund; create a new section of KRS Chapter 159 to identify student enrollment and withdrawal requirements to be followed by a charter school; create a new section of KRS Chapter 161 to identify employment conditions for charter school staff; create a new section of KRS Chapter 157 to require local, state, and federal funds to be distributed to charter schools using formulas and allocation processes used in public schools; amend KRS 161.220 to include a teacher employed by a board of directors of a public charter school as a member within the state retirement system; amend KRS 161.220 to include employees of boards of directors of public charter schools in the state-sponsored retirement system; amend KRS 78.510 to include noncertified employees of public charter schools in the state-sponsored retirement system.

 

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

Jeff Hoover on Teacher Pensions

House Republican Floor Leader Jeff Hoover attempts to use teacher pension reform as an argument in favor of electing a GOP majority to the Kentucky House.

In an article for the Courier-Journal, he points out:

The Comprehensive Annual Financial Report issued by KTRS this past December shows the system had approximately 75,000 active and 47,000 retired members. The report states the funding level this past year was 51.9 percent, with $13.85 billion in unfunded liabilities. According to data released by the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce this past week, a key reason for this underfunding is actual employer contributions to the system have been significantly less than the amount required to sustain financial obligations.

Hoover is right to note that the teacher pension system may soon face problems. Not being able to pay benefits promised and owed would be devastating.

And, in his article, he’s simply calling for the creation of a task force to examine the issue and make recommendations.

That, too, seems reasonable.

Fixing the pension problem won’t be easy and it will take political courage.

But, let’s be clear: Teachers are not the ones who failed to properly fund the pension system for years and years. Teachers did not make promises they couldn’t meet. Teachers should not bear the brunt of any proposed pension reform. The budget in Kentucky should not be balanced on the backs of Kentucky’s teachers.

Comprehensive reform that ensures the teacher pension fund is able to meet future obligations must include proper funding of those obligations. That will mean that new revenue must go to the fund OR that other programs are cut to make room in the budget for teacher pensions.

Kentucky made a promise to its teachers. Kentucky’s political leadership should keep that promise.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow @KYEdReport

 

 

Steve Beshear on Education

Last night, Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear delivered his State of the Commonwealth address.  Here’s what he had to say about education in Kentucky and his plans for the upcoming legislative session:

I talk to business executives almost daily about what they need to make their companies successful. They tell me that factors like low taxes, incentives, good roads, logistical support and low utility rates are all important. But their No. 1 concern is their workforce finding enough talented, skilled, energetic, healthy and educated workers.

Many years ago, Kentucky’s national story when it came to education was cause for embarrassment. Scores were low, and on most measures we lagged far behind. But thanks to decades of hard work and aggressive policy changes, Kentucky has carved out a new reputation as a reform-minded state that is innovative, bold and determined.

That new reputation was further strengthened early in 2013, when Education Week’s annual Quality Counts report ranked Kentucky in the top 10 states in student performance and education progress …

and a few months later, when a Harvard study ranked us eighth in student performance improvement over the last two decades. We also rank sixth in the number of teachers earning National Board Certification. So now, when our educators attend national conferences, they are barraged with questions from leaders in other states who want to know: How is Kentucky doing it, and how can they replicate our success? ***

Since I became governor, our efforts have focused on three areas:
Improving early childhood education.
Raising the graduation rate.
And increasing the college and career readiness of our students, who will become the workforce upon which Kentucky’s economic future depends.

In the first area, early childhood, we have coalesced around a concept called “kindergarten readiness” and are implementing a kindergarten entry screener to evaluate where incoming students stand on cognitive, physical and emotional skills.

Three weeks ago, our efforts received a game-changing boost when we were awarded a $44.3 million Race to the Top grant to improve early learning programs for thousands of Kentucky preschoolers.
Here in Kentucky, the initiative is called the All-STARS plan — Accelerating learning Statewide Through an Advanced Rating System. I will seek legislation needed to implement the goals of the All-STARS plan which will  provide for more accountability and better transparency throughout our state’s early childcare system. Getting our children off to a better start in life
 all of our children, not just those in wealthy, two-parent households
 will dictate our success as a state.
In the second area, graduation rates, we are making huge strides.

Our graduation rate improved from 69.7 percent for the class of 2000 to 79.9 percent for the class of 2010. This year, Kentucky joined other states in using a more accurate way to measure the number of students who graduate. Our rate of 86 percent when measured against the most recent data from other states ranks us among the top states. And that rate will continue to improve as we implement the Graduation Bill passed last session and other important supports for these at-risk students. As you recall, Kentucky’s 173 school districts had the option of increasing the compulsory school attendance age from 16 to 18 for the 2015 school year, with the bill  becoming mandatory once 96 of the districts had done so. Well, it didn’t take long. We exceeded that goal in just two weeks, and the First Lady and I are so proud of our education community for stepping up so rapidly. So far, 140 of our 173 districts have adopted that new policy.

The third area, college and career readiness, is a measure of whether our schools are doing their job. In 2010, only 34 percent of Kentucky high school graduates were adequately prepared to take the next step in life. Today, that number is 54 percent putting us on target to meet the 2015 goal of 67  percent. That’s a huge jump, and it is partly the result of new standards for learning that hold students and teachers to a higher bar. Since 2011, public school educators have been using the Kentucky version of Common Core academic standards in English/language arts and mathematics, which define the minimum that students should know at each grade level. Core Content plays down rote memorization, and instead gives students the skills that today’s workplace demands: creative and critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, creativity and communication.

 

As the first state to adopt the standards, Kentucky won national recognition in a variety of places. TIME magazine, for example, said we “barreled headlong into the future.”

And I love the headline of the article in TIME: “What Every Child Can Learn from Kentucky.”
 We were also the second state to adopt the Next-Generation Science Standards, and now we’re creating standards for social studies and arts and the humanities. We also are implementing a new model of secondary career and technical education to make it more accessible to students at an earlier age, more rigorous academically and  better aligned with both postsecondary requirements and employer needs. Furthermore, we have seen a 28 percent increase in the number of students transferring credits from our two-year colleges to our four-year programs.
The bottom line: We are fitting the pieces together to create a seamless, cradle-to-career education system that is better preparing our students for this complex world.

I know that you and I want nothing less than to produce the brightest minds in the world and to create a workforce that companies fall all over themselves to come to Kentucky to hire. And we’re getting there. But ladies and gentlemen, that progress is in jeopardy with every dollar we cut out of education.

Throughout the recent historic recession, you and I protected SEEK, the basic funding formula for classrooms, from cuts. But preserving funding isn’t enough. From 2000 to 2008, SEEK grew an average of 3.4 percent each year. But from 2008 to 2014, it grew zero percent
 even as enrollment expanded, costs increased, and local support in some areas dropped. Furthermore, to balance our budget during the recession, we eliminated funding for textbooks and significantly reduced funding for teacher training and school safety.  Now, despite these austerity measures, Kentucky’s education community still made tremendous progress for our children, placing Kentucky on the leading edge of education reform in this country.

But they have stretched every dollar they have as far as they can — and now they’re out of options. To add to the pain, Kentucky schools are facing the delayed impact of the federal sequester cuts. They will have to figure out how to make up the loss of approximately $28 million in federal funding in the current fiscal year, with the potential for an additional $28 million hit in the next year.

If we continue to cut or freeze education funding, our schools face the prospect of laying off significant numbers of teachers, greatly increasing class room sizes and letting technology and equipment grow more outdated and useless. We are in danger of losing all of the positive momentum which has been built up. And I am not going to allow that to happen. I am determined to find money to reinvest in education
 – 
 even if I have to make harmful cuts in other areas to do so.
Beshear also mentioned the need to increase teacher pay to keep Kentucky competitive.
The education community was likely pleased, as they have been pushing for new funding in recent months.
By contrast, Senate President Robert Stivers released a GOP agenda that did not include education funding among it’s top 5 goals for 2014.
For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport

Senate GOP Top Priorities Don’t Include Education

The Kentucky Senate begins its 2014 session today and Senate Republicans have released a list of their top 5 priorities.

Senate President Robert Stivers issued a press release outlining the GOP’s goals for 2014. They include:

1) Reigning in the Governor by giving the legislature the power to overturn administrative regulations proposed by the administration.  This is largely in response to the hugely successful rollout of Kentucky’s healthcare exchange and Medicaid expansion, ideas that are apparently quite popular with Kentuckians but which the KY GOP opposed.

2) Limiting the General Fund debt limit.

3) Legislative Pension Fix — addressing the enlargement of a legislator’s pension when s/he leaves the legislature for a judgeship or executive branch job.

4) Informed consent before a woman receives an abortion.

5) Addressing Kentucky’s growing heroin problem.

Sure, the Senate GOP likely has other top priorities, but these are the five they’ve chosen to highlight.  The first one is simply about frustration with a Governor who has been fairly successful at managing the government even though Republicans disagree with where he’s going.

And yes, the other four items all merit some attention.

But, what’s missing? There’s no mention at all of education. No mention of restoring SEEK funding to 2008 levels. No mention of addressing teacher pay. No mention of investment needed to keep Kentucky schools moving forward.  Not even a mention of one of the Kentucky Chamber’s top goals, charter schools.

Does Kentucky’s GOP have an education agenda? It’s possible, but they sure aren’t talking about it.

 

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport

KY Chamber Backs Charters

Kentucky Chamber of Commerce CEO Dave Adkisson discussed the organization’s legislative priorities today.  On education, the Chamber seeks to protect school funding – note, not increase or improve, but simply protect existing funds and also to allow charters.

KY Chamber Ed

As the legislature considers the recommendation of the Chamber to allow charters, legislators should also look to other states for some important lessons.

I’ve written before about the unfortunate experience Ohio has had with charters over a long period of time.

Additionally, it seems the Chamber would do well to advance the cause of restoring school funding to 2008 levels, not just protecting funding at its present state.

For more Kentucky education politics and policy news, follow us @KYEdReport

Kentucky Education News – 11-22-13

This week saw a focused push by education advocates to convince the Kentucky General Assembly to restore education funding to 2008 levels.

Stu Silberman of the Prichard Committee penned this piece calling for a continued focus on progress.

Meanwhile, Andrew Brennen, the student member of the Prichard Committee, made a presentation during which he noted:

Some students pay $130 in fees, but don’t have access to textbooks. And those who do have textbooks often find them in “decrepit” shape, a tangible symbol of the cuts, said Brennen.

Finally, the Courier-Journal ran a story on Superintendent salaries, noting that while some have actually decreased and most have remained relatively flat in recent years, a number of districts have actually substantially increased Superintendent pay.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport