Same Old Secrets

The Kentucky Democratic Party responds to the Bevin Special Session on pensions:

It’s truly unbelievable the lengths Matt Bevin and the Republicans in the General Assembly will go to take away people’s hard-earned retirements.

 

Yesterday, at 3:45, Governor Matt Bevin called a special session for 8 p.m. that night. That isn’t even enough notice for all of the legislators to travel to Frankfort!

 

And then, after they gaveled in, the Republicans started the same behind closed doors, secret legislating that got them in trouble in the first place.

 

In the middle of all the chaos, a reporter observed Democratic house leaders asking Speaker Osborne to at least be included in the conversation about what was happening. In his reply, Osborne let his true feelings shine through: “Who says we’re having a conversation?”

 

That’s not right. But the Republican Party of Kentucky, led by Governor Bevin, isn’t interested in doing what’s right. They’re just interested in showing everyone they can do what they want, when they want.

 

Bevin and his buddies are going to waste at least $300,000 trying to cut police, firefighter, teacher and other state employee retirement benefits in a special session. It’s wasteful on so many levels.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

Another Bad Move from Bevin

Just days after the Kentucky Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the sewer-pension bill hastily passed in the waning hours of the 2018 legislative session violated procedure  and therefore could not be implemented, Governor Matt Bevin gave four hours advance notice of a special legislative session to deal with the pension issue.

The Lexington Herald-Leader has more:

In a surprise move Monday, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin called a special legislative session to deal with the state’s struggling pension systems. He made the announcement just before 4 p.m. Monday, saying the session would begin four hours later at 8 p.m.

“I am going to use the powers that have been granted to me to call the legislature into special session that will be effective tonight at eight o’clock,” Bevin said in a brief statement. “They will be coming in.”

Some speculate legislative leaders are poised to act on the now defunct sewer bill — this time, following proper procedure and giving the measure the required number of public hearings.

Bevin faces re-election in 2019 and is looking at an array of strong Democratic opponents. Moving on the pension bill is likely a way to bolster his support among his base.

Groups of teachers, who organized protests during pension debates earlier this year are already pledging to be on hand tonight when the legislature begins session.

Due to the incredibly short notice, it is likely lawmakers far from Frankfort will have difficulty making the opening gavel.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport