Seeking a Commissioner

With the retirement of Commissioner Terry Holliday, Kentucky finds itself searching for a new Commissioner of Education.  Here’s the official job posting:

The Kentucky Board of Education invites applications and nominations for the position of Commissioner of Education. The Commissioner reports to the 11-member Kentucky Board of Education and leads the Kentucky Department of Education in providing resources and guidance to Kentucky’s public schools and districts as they implement the Commonwealth’s P-12 education requirements. The department also serves as the Commonwealth’s liaison for federal education requirements and funding opportunities. Located in Frankfort, Kentucky, the department has approximately 1,100 full-time employees (includes the Kentucky School for the Deaf, Kentucky School for the Blind, Kentucky Department of Education Frankfort-based employees, Office of Career and Technical Education Frankfort-based central office staff and 53 area technical centers).

The board is seeking an individual who shares its commitment to putting the needs and interests of students first and foremost and preparing them for success in their education, career and citizenship. Partnering with educators to collectively deliver on this promise presents the selected person the chance to apply innovative approaches in order to move students beyond college- and career-readiness toward global competency. The individual also must pursue difficult issues with a firmness of purpose, exhibit respect of others, show consistency and depth of thought, and present a deep appreciation and respect for diversity and inclusion.
The successful candidate must provide leadership that assists the board in developing the vision, strategy and objectives to advance the Commonwealth’s priorities of rigorous standards–based education. Further, the commissioner must build consensus among constituency groups such as legislative, business, community and school leaders.
An advanced degree is required. The successful candidate must have experience in leading complex organizations as well as a deep commitment to reaching proficiency in teaching and learning for all Kentucky schools.
Greenwood/Asher & Associates, Inc. is assisting the Kentucky Board of Education in the search. Initial screening of applications will begin immediately and will continue until an appointment is made. For best consideration, submit your materials by July 17, 2015. Individuals who wish to nominate a candidate should submit a letter of nomination including contact information for the nominee. Application materials should include a letter addressing how the candidate’s experiences match the position requirements, a curriculum vitae or resume and five references. Submission of materials as PDF attachments is strongly encouraged. Confidential inquiries, nominations and application materials should be directed to:
Jan Greenwood, Betty Turner Asher, Partners
Greenwood/Asher & Associates, Inc.
42 Business Centre Drive, Suite 206
Miramar Beach, Florida 32550
Phone: 850-650-2277 / Fax: 850-650-2272
Email: jangreenwood@greenwoodsearch.com
Email: bettyasher@greenwoodsearch.com
Email: shelleyfeather@greenwoodsearch.com
To see the posting at the Department’s site, click here.
For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

 

Holliday Announces Retirement

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday announced today he plans to retire from his post effective August 31st. Although the move came on April 1st, it was most certainly not a joke.

Holliday informed his staff in the morning, then presented a letter to the State Board of Education. He has served as Education Commissioner since 2010.

No word yet on the process to replace him.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

Charters, Pensions, and Funding

Those are the Big 3 issues identified by Commissioner Terry Holliday for the 2015 legislative session.

Holliday outlined his thoughts on the 2015 session in a December post on his blog.

He notes that if charters are adopted at all, it will likely be a small pilot program that would allow for a handful of charters in districts with especially troubling achievement gaps (likely JCPS).

The Prichard Committee has been reviewing the research on charters and will likely weigh-in at some point, too.

Teacher pension reform has been and will continue to be a hot legislative topic.

Essentially, the Kentucky General Assembly balanced the state budget for years in part by under-funding the Kentucky Teacher Retirement System.

Now, their negligence has caught up with them and teachers may see benefit changes or reductions in future payments by way of adjusted (down) cost-0f-living increases.

Holliday also says that while the session is not a budget session, some funding issues may surface.

Another potential topic of interest is allowing school systems to merge in order to maximize financial efficiency.

Tune in this session for more on the big education issues facing Kentucky policymakers.

For more on education policy and politics in Kentucky, follow @KYEdReport

 

Will Kentucky Be in the Top 20 by 2020?

That’s the question asked annually by a Prichard Committee analysis of key education indicators. The goal of the Prichard Committee is to have Kentucky among the Top 20 in the nation in key education indicators by 2020.  According to a press release announcing the most recent analysis of where Kentucky stands, there is some good news.  The state is on track to be in the Top 20 nationally in six key indicators of education success by 2020. This include number of AP credits, reading scores, and teacher salaries.

Here’s the entire release from Prichard:

LEXINGTON, Ky. – Moving Kentucky into the top tier of states in key areas of
education by 2020 will require a hard push for improvement in the next six
years, according to a new report from the Prichard Committee for Academic
Excellence.

The 2014 update of the Committee’s “Top 20 by 2020” found
Kentucky’s performance in six categories to be on track to reach the goal. These
include reading scores, Advanced Placement credits and teacher
salaries.

But other indicators show reason for concern. The report noted
that Kentucky lost ground in the math achievement of eighth-grade students and
the share of higher education costs that families must pay. The state’s
performance also showed no net improvement in total higher education funding or
bachelor’s degrees earned in science, technology, engineering and
math.

The state’s ranking in other areas showed some improvement, but not
at a rate sufficient to reach the Top 20 by 2020. These include the number of
adults with a high school diploma, preschool enrollment, per-pupil funding and
adults with a bachelor’s degree.

The Prichard Committee began its Top 20
measurements in 2008, when it issued a challenge to the state to accelerate the
improvement of its education system. The latest report is the third update of
the initial measurement. The update is available here.

Education Commissioner Terry Holliday applauded the report for highlighting Kentucky’s
progress in areas like reading, Advanced Placement and teacher salaries, and for
also providing a clear roadmap of the areas that need further attention going
forward.

“We are proud of the progress Kentucky students and educators
have made the past several years as they have embraced more rigorous standards
and become more focused on college- and career-readiness,” Holliday said. “At
the same time, the report confirms what we already know:  there is still much
work to be done. We need to be making faster gains in key content areas like
mathematics and science while also continuing to close achievement gaps so that
all students have the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in life. We are
committed to making continuous progress, and are grateful for partners like the
Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence for joining us in this critical
work.”

Bob King, president of the Council on Postsecondary Education,
noted the state’s increase in bachelor’s degrees, from 44th to 39th in the last
six years, and expressed the importance of partnerships to work toward the
Prichard Committee’s 2020 goal.

“The steady improvement in bachelor degrees or higher and adults with a high school diploma is welcome news to Kentucky’s economic future. We look forward to working alongside Prichard and our other partners to make even greater gains in the future.”

The update
also noted the Committee’s three overarching priorities for Kentucky
education:
·         A strong accountability system that measures the
performance of students, teachers, principals and postsecondary
graduates;
·         Adequate funding;
·         Sustained and expanded
engagement of parents, community members and businesses in support of
schools.

“It is great to see the areas where we are making good progress
but we still have a lot of work to do. We will continue to monitor these areas
and look forward to evidence of more forward progress in the 2016 report,” said
Stu Silberman, executive director of the Prichard Committee.

Find more on Kentucky education from the Prichard Blog

Kentucky Schools SEEK Funding Restoration

Gaming, Tax Reform among ideas for generating revenue for schools

Kentucky’s public schools are seeking a restoration of funding to 2008 levels in the 2014 budget year.

Yes, you read that correctly.  Kentucky school districts want to go back to 2008 funding levels.  That’s because funding has steadily been decreasing for Kentucky public schools.  First, the economic collapse in 2008 caused tough budget years.  Then, the legislature faced its own budget challenges because of a failure to address public pension underfunding.  So, the Kentucky General Assembly didn’t decrease funding in the SEEK formula, they just left it the same.  However, the number of students in Kentucky schools steadily increased over the past five years.  Meaning schools and districts are operating on less dollars per pupil than they were just 5 years ago.

In addition to flat SEEK funding, “flexible funds” for schools have actually decreased.  So, districts are left to either make up the funds locally (difficult in many rural communities) or, go without.  Districts report cutting items like foreign language and school counseling, even eliminating the use of buses for extra-curricular activities.

While districts have so far gotten by, they say that if the trend continues, more serious program cuts are on the way.

For their part, lawmakers have generally sounded unsympathetic, noting they’ve had to balance some tough budgets.  Of course, it was the General Assembly that failed to properly fund promised pensions in the past — so, they created the mess they now complain about.

That said, Governor Beshear has talked about both tax reform and expanded gaming as ways to generate revenue to mitigate the state’s budget woes.

Both Education Commissioner Terry Holliday and Prichard Committee Executive Director Stu Silberman have been calling for a renewed commitment to proper funding of Kentucky’s schools.

For more on Kentucky education politics and policy, follow us @KYEdReport

Kentucky’s Investment in Schools Drops at Wrong Time

Well, it’s never really the right time to decrease your investment in schools, but Kentucky has seen its investment in schools decrease at a time when the economy is in greatest need of improvements in education.

That’s the conclusion drawn by the Kentucky Center on Economic Policy in this study.

As Commissioner Holliday and Stu Silberman have argued, the 2014 session of the Kentucky General Assembly is a critical one for Kentucky schools.

With a decrease in per pupil spending of nearly $500 since 2008, Kentucky can ill afford NOT to invest additional dollars in schools this session.

It’s an election year, so maybe that will motivate lawmakers to do the right thing and start getting education dollars moving in the right direction again.

Yes, revenue and budget priorities are tricky issues — but nothing is more important than keeping Kentucky’s schools moving forward.

For more on education politics and policy in Kentucky, follow us @KyEdReport